Business Briefs: October 2015

October 2015

In August, The Factory, the now-iconic 36-acre sports and entertainment complex in Wake Forest, was sold for just under $18 million by owner/developer Jeff Ammons to The Macsydney Co., a group of investors from New York and Oregon. Fortunately for the sports and retail tenants and the thousands of people who use the facility, the new owners are happy with what they’ve purchased and, according to several published sources, intend to bring in additional family-oriented businesses. Emma Bennett, who has served as the event and property manager for The Factory, has been retained by the Macsydney Co. Ammons, who purchased the former street-sweeper manufacturing plant in 2003 for $4 million, now has his sights set on developing a similar, larger facility in Morrisville. The buildings at The Factory were 100% percent leased at the time of the sale.

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Virgilio’s Premium Vinegars, Oils & Edibles has moved from Downtown Wake Forest to a new space in The Factory, Ste #112, next to Lily Mae’s and Clay Fusion. With the Sept. 1 move, the company has expanded. In addition to more than 40 flavors of extra virgin olive oil and vinegars, owner Margarita Dixon now has a commercial baking kitchen on-site, allowing her to hold cooking classes for adults and kids. Also new and available are charcuterie, breads, baked goods, coffee, espresso, wine by the glass or bottle, and beer for purchase. Visit on Friday evenings for music from 8-10 p.m. (919) 717-3373. Hours: Tuesday-Thursday 11 a.m. to 8 p.m., Friday 11 a.m. to 10 p.m., Saturday 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. For offerings and event information, visit Virgilio’s online at virgiliosvinegarnoil.com and on Facebook.

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Also new to The Factory is Espresso Self Café, which opened Oct. 14. Owners David and Amy Condon describe the company as “a creative art space and coffee shop that features various art classes, tutoring in basic high school subjects, exhibition of local artists’ work, live acoustic music and delicious pastries and fresh brewed coffee.” The café caters to kids, teens, young families, and home-schooling families as a place to come, have refreshments and participate in activities such as storytime for the young ones and crafts. Check with them regarding open mic nights and other events. Phone: (984) 235-1450. Hours: Monday-Friday 12-7 p.m., Saturday 7 a.m.-8 p.m.; Sundays vary. Hours are subject to change. For more information, visit online at espressoselfcafe.com and on Facebook.

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Gooey’s American Grille opened Aug. 17 at 950 Gateway Commons in Wake Forest. The focus is cheese, comfort food and a fun, family, community-oriented restaurant with affordable prices (no item is over $8), according to owner John Brewer. Brewer and co-owner Howard Udell hope the concept will grow into more restaurants. Along with a variety of sandwiches (including gourmet grilled cheeses), Gooey’s soups are made from scratch with no manufactured soup base. Everything on the menu is roasted and prepared on-site, lending a fresh, natural approach to food. Accepts major credit cards and cash. Take-out and outdoor seating available. 919-761-5191. Hours: Monday-Thursday 11 a.m.-9 p.m., Friday and Saturday 11 a.m.-10 p.m., Sunday 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Visit online at gooeysamericangrille.com and on Facebook.

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For the third time in three years, Perkins Counseling & Psychological Services has expanded. Dr. Pamela Perkins and her team of nine therapists opened their new facility for patients on Sept. 14 at 10580 Ligon Mill Road, Wake Forest. The move doubles the firm’s office space to more than 3,200 square feet. A ribbon cutting to celebrate the opening of the new office was sponsored by the Wake Forest Chamber of Commerce on Sept. 10. The comprehensive group practice features a team of professional, highly qualified clinicians offering therapy and testing services for all ages from preschoolers to older adults. For more information, visit perkinscps.com or call (919) 263-9592.